News Highlights


BCC Welcomes New Leader ar-170729981.jpg

Anthropology Ph.D. alumna Eva Bagg is the new superintendent and president of Barstow Community College.


Teaching students across disciplines to detect, map and characterize changes to the Earth 1-3g8hocgo4_qlqwnmr5pq7g.gif
Anthropology graduate student Brady Liss and his classwork with the UC San Diego Big Pixel Initiative was included in a Google Earth and Earth Engine blog post.

Renaming Non-communicable Diseases

Janis Jenkins and graduate student Ellen Kozelka of Anthropology publish a letter in The Lancet.

San Diego Archaeologists are Going Underwater for a Deeper Look at Humanity's Past News - Underwater
KPBS took a look at the region’s efforts to support marine archaeology, including the recent launch of an effort co-led by the Division of Social Sciences, the Scripps Center for Marine Archaeology. Thomas Levy of Anthropology is co-director. He discusses plans to explore a submerged Israeli port that might have been an important trade hub during the time of kings David and Solomon.

Research IT Awarded Grant for 3D Visualization Project with the Hearst Museum hearstcave_photogrammetry_1200px.jpg
The Student Technology Fund committee at UC Berkeley recently awarded Research IT a grant for the two-year project, Student 3D/Visualization Teams for Campus Museums, which will be run in collaboration with the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology (PAHMA).

What Color Blue did King Solomon Wear? New Evidence Tells Us 31-e1498662009993-635x357.jpg
Excavations of copper mines find earliest Israeli traces of dye used for prestigious garments for skilled workers.

UC San Diego Researchers Discover Human Burials and Artifacts in Ancient Mycenaean Tomb kastrouli_part-of-mycenaenean-stirrup-jar-found-with-human-remains.jpg
Researchers excavating what was believed to be a completely looted ancient Greek tomb have discovered 15 adult and two juvenile human burials, as well as artifacts dated to a period just before the collapse of Mycenaean society during the late Bronze Age.

Giving Students a Place to Prep for Tomorrow's Virtual (Reality) Economy vrlab_team_flexing.jpg
It’s a laboratory that looks like a cross between a classroom and a tech pavilion at the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. There are virtual-reality headsets everywhere, and large, flat-screen 3D displays. College students work at computers, while teammates wearing goggles look from side to side, occasionally ducking or recoiling, as they react and engage with the virtual environments visible in their head-mounted displays.

Hacking Into a Lost World archeology-hacking-vr.jpg
Somewhere in the at-risk ruins of Khirbat en-Nahas in the Faynan region of southern Jordan lie untold stories of copper mining and smelting industries from the time of David and Solomon and the Edomite kings. Stories that, until now, could only be told in words, maps and photographs. Thanks to UC San Diego engineering and archaeology students that teamed up for the world’s first cyber-archaeology hackathon, the story of King Solomon’s copper mines now exists in virtual reality.

An Archaeologist Perspective on Humans and Climate Change 
How are modern day humans adapting to climate change? To find the answer, archaeologists are studying how human societies have responded to environmental changes in the past.Isabel Rivera-Collazofocuses on understanding human resilience and adaptation to past environmental change as a lens through which we can view the future. Finding answers involves diverse disciplines, including archeology, anthropology, geomorphology, ecosystem dynamics and climate science. Join us to learn how her work at Scripps Oceanography and in UC San Diego's Department of Archeology are changing the way we view climate change and its impacts on society.

Found: Fresh Clues to Mystery of King Solomon's Mines  found-fresh-clues-to-mystery-of-king-solomon-mines.jpg
Manure preserved for millennia by the arid climate of Israel’s Timna Valley is adding fresh fuel toa long- simmering debate about the biblical king Solomon and the source of his legendary wealth.

 

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